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20120901
20120930
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
to the united states attorney, who is melinda haig, who is going to say some words to you. thank you. [ applause ] >> wow. you guys really are happy to be out of school. so nice to see all of you, as richard said, good morning everyone. as richard said my name is melinda haigh, the united states attorney for the northern district of border to monterey and our office is just a couple of blocks away in san francisco. [ applause ] so we love it here. many of you probably don't know what the united states attorney is or what they do or anything like that, but i was nominated by president obama to be the united states attorney here two years ago. yes, my boss. [ applause ] and i'm honored to represent him, the president, the administration and the department of justice in northern california and in san francisco and in that capacity to welcome you here today to see this movie screening. there are 800 san francisco public high school students here today. so thank you for being here. [ applause ] it's really amazing. really amazing. there are 2400 of your classmates sitting in movie theaters around
states and we work on how europe and the united states can work together on the major world challenges like climate change and economic trade and development, just a number of issues the program i run goes back to the early days in the first 20 years when we were primarily a grantmaker making grants to low-cal practitioners and policymakers. i started this program about four years, five years ago now, i think, time flies, to really bring in members of our marshall memorial fellowship network of which david chiu is one of our alumni. some of our past grantees and also the next crop of practitioners and local civic leaders who are really looking to change their home communities by looking abroad or looking to other cities to see what other cities are doing well and how that might be imported back home or translated back home. so the comparative dom particular policy program works primarily in the 25 cities that doug mentioned, but not exclusively in those cities. we really are looking for some of the best practices in education and workforce development, in integration of diverse populat
of independence for women. it marked the beginning of the women's equality movement in the united states. >> at that time, women were banned from holding property and voting in elections. >> susan b. anthony dedicated her life to reform. >> suffrage in the middle of the 19th century accomplished one goal, it was diametrically opposed to this idea. >> many feared it would be corrupted by politics. >> women in the 19th century had to convince male voters that having the vote would not change anything. that woman would still be devoted to the home, the family, that they would remain pure and innocent, that having the vote would not corrupt them. >> support gradually grew in state and local campaigns. >> leaders like ellen clark sgt come repeatedly stopping these meetings -- , repeatedly stopping these meetings as a politically active figure. doing everything they could to ground the campaign in domesticity. >> despite their efforts, the link made it tough whenever voters were in the big city. a specialist in francisco. >> the problem with san francisco is that women's suffrage as an idea wa
. after the united states would not give him his visa, i asked him -- i told him about mutanabbi street and he wrote a poem and he wrote it in english, though he writes in, of course, in arabic. but this one he wrote in english. so i'll read it. one figure in the poem you should know, humbaba, which is an ogre, a monster of immemorial age. that was a special big garden, a forest, where all types of trees and flowers grew. the trees bending down gently flinging branches. our orchard grew like a crown on the sun's eyebrow. where did humbaba come from? his mother was just a cave, his father unknown. who made him a friend pretending guardian of the orchard. did those nice shrubs need fear to go begging for a garden and have humbaba in his treachery ilk. those plants and flowers were like books everyone could read, not cut and throw away. their different fantastic colors had formed our blood so our veins ran smoothly, our 7 wonders showed. then humbaba made a whirlwind of fire and snow. who crowned him king? who showed him our garden was but a jail? humbaba was great and scary, but not so ve
and largest state in the nation to approve this. one decade later, we have full voting rights in the united states. helping newly enfranchised women, a new political movement was founded. >> starting in the 1920's, it was a movement created by the suffragettes moving forward to getting the right to vote. all of the suffragettes were interested in educating the new voters. >> non-partisan, not endorsing candidates >> -- endorsing candidates, getting the right to vote and one they have their voice heard. >> the 100th anniversary of women's suffrage is taking
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)